The Wild Places by Robert Macfarlane – Book Review

Are there any wild places left in Ireland and Britain? In his book, The Wild Places, Robert Macfarlane embarks on a journey through mountains, islands, moors, forests, salt marshes, and more, searching for ‘wildness’.  But Macfarlane must revaluate his own ideas and preconceptions about ‘wildness’ as he discovers and maps the so called ‘wild places’ on these islands in this well-researched book. His search takes him to a variety of landscapes, from the hostile pinnacle of Ben Hope to the fascinating Burren in Ireland. Each landscape is unique and layered as natural and human history entwine.

The Sea by John Banville – Book Recommendation

As a child, did you imagine you would be the person you have become? Do you believe memories, especially childhood memories, are like a collection of “polished tiles” that would “someday be the marvellously finished pavilion of the self?” How much of what we remember is true and when does memory give way to fantasy? John Banville explores the unstable qualities of memory and grief in The Sea [2005], a novel awarded the Man Booker Prize in 2005. When we look back at our memories we are confronted with uncertainty, blurred details, figments of imagination, unreliable emotions and doubtful truths about the very events that shape us as adults.

The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde – Book Recommendation

Wilde’s only novel is a complex labyrinth about art, corruption, morality, sin, and society’s idolatry of the sensual world. The young and beautiful Dorian Gray, like Narcissus, falls in love with the power of his own beauty after seeing a portrait of himself. He uses his supernatural charm and influence over people to live life to the fullest: he denies himself no earthly pleasures, regardless of the cost to himself and others. Like Dorian, we love a good filter on reality. Read why Wilde's novel still resonates with us today.

Three Books That Got Me Through The First Six Months Of Motherhood

No amount of reading will prepare you for the first months of motherhood. That being said, there are some books that I found useful as I navigated the first six months of keeping (myself and) my little human alive, well, and happy. There are so many conflicting opinions about what you should and shouldn't do and before you know it, your head’s spinning and you start to question yourself and your good intentions. Sound familiar? Read on.

A Tale for the Time Being – Ruth Ozeki

A Hello Kitty lunchbox. A writer on a remote island suffering from writer’s block. Musings on the nature of Time. A bullied teenage girl in Japan. A watch. A Buddhist nun. Big philosophical questions. A cat called Pesto. Proust. A suicidal software developer. Tsunamis and Twin Towers. A World War Two kamikaze pilot… This is Ruth Ozeki’s 'A Tale for the Time Being.'